Tag Archive: Longleaf

Control Burning Newly Planted Longleaf Pines and Saplings

Controlling competing vegetation and brown spot disease are two main reasons we prescribe burn young longleaf plantations: Longleaf pine seedlings do not like competing vegetation and will stay in the grass stage for years if vegetation is not controlled by fire, mowing or herbicides. Using improved containerized seedlings along with good vegetation management can release …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/05/22/control-burning-newly-planted-longleaf-pines-and-saplings-2/

Control Burning Newly Planted Longleaf Pines and Saplings

Prescribe burning is an effective method for controlling brown spot needle blight in longleaf pines. Photo credit: Mike Goodchild Controlling competing vegetation and brown spot disease are two of the main reasons prescribe burns are recommended for young longleaf plantations: Longleaf pine seedling do not compete well with vegetation, and will stay in the grass …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2016/04/01/control-burning-newly-planted-longleaf-pines-and-saplings/

The Majestic Longleaf: One of the South’s Distinguished Trees

Longleaf pine’s desirable characteristics have motivated restoration efforts on timber-lands, agricultural lands, private lands, and public lands. Photo by Judy Ludlow Steeped in history, the majestic longleaf (Pinus palustris) is an economically and ecologically important tree species of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains. Its species name “palustris” means “of the marsh,” and although it …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/10/the-majestic-longleaf-one-of-the-souths-distinguished-trees-2/

The Majestic Longleaf: One of the South’s Distinguished Trees

Longleaf pine’s desirable characteristics have motivated restoration efforts on timber-lands, agricultural lands, private lands, and public lands. Photo by Judy Ludlow Steeped in history, the majestic longleaf (Pinus palustris) is an economically and ecologically important tree species of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains. Its species name “palustris” means “of the marsh,” and although it …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/10/the-majestic-longleaf-one-of-the-souths-distinguished-trees/

Longleaf Pine Incentive Program for Landowners west of the Appalachicola

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Announces Longleaf Pine Incentives for Landowners The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) Florida Forest Service (FFS) is currently accepting applications  through June 27, 2014 for its Longleaf Pine Landowner Incentive Program which offers Florida’s non-industrial private landowners incentive payments for longleaf pine restoration. “Longleaf pine …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/05/23/longleaf-pine-incentive-program-for-landowners-west-of-the-appalachicola/

Longleaf Pine Restoration & Management Workshop

Longleaf Pine habitat. Photo by Judy Ludlow There will be a workshop on Longleaf Pine Forest Restoration and Management held in Washington County on May 14, 2014. This will be an excellent opportunity for Panhandle landowners to learn more about the possibilities of growing Longleaf Pine on their property. Longleaf pine has many favorable characteristics …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/04/05/longleaf-pine-restoration-management-workshop/