Tag Archive: Health

Peanut Nodule Analysis to Assess Crop Health

Picture: UF/IFAS agronomy students dig up peanut plants for a nodule sample at the Suwannee Valley Agricultural Extension Center near Live Oak, FL David Hensley and Diane Rowland, UF/IFAS Agronomy Department One of the primary benefits of growing legumes like peanut is their ability to convert nitrogen in the atmosphere to a form that is …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/18/peanut-nodule-analysis-to-assess-crop-health/

Keep an Eye on Your Eye Health – August is National Eye Exam Month

Most of us are willing to go to the doctor or the dentist, which are both part of taking care of our health. However, do you go to the eye doctor? If not, you definitely should add it to your healthy lifestyle regime. Eye exams at every age and stage of life can help you …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/08/05/keep-an-eye-on-your-eye-health-august-is-national-eye-exam-month/

4-H Horse Health Clinic Scheduled for June 13th

The Area A 4-H Horse Advisory Committee is pleased to welcome Dr. Bess Darrow, DVM and Mr. Billy Blackman, Professional Farrier to our first Area A 4-H Equine Clinic.  Our focus will be on overall equine health, as well as dental and hoof concerns.  There is no fee for this clinic but you must register …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2017/06/30/4-h-horse-health-clinic-scheduled-for-june-13th/

Honey Bee Health & Best Management Strategies – August 30th

Florida A&M University will be hosting a bee health workshop on Sunday, August 30th from 11AM to 5PM at the FAMU Research and Education Center in Quincy.  The workshop will be led by Michael Schmaeling of the Rodale Institute. Credit: Honey Bee Research and Extension Laboratory, University of Florida. Topics to be discussed at the workshop …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/08/22/honey-bee-health-best-management-strategies-august-30th/

Beat the Heat this Summer – Stay Hydrated for Health

Stay hydrated to beat the heat! Summer is in full swing and our part of the country is very hot.  When the temperature rises, proper hydration is extra important. You need to provide your body with the fluid that it needs to stay healthy. Water regulates many different body processes, including body temperature, digestion, and …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/07/31/beat-the-heat-this-summer-stay-hydrated-for-health/

The Cow is the First Source of Calf Health

Colostrum consumption is a key factor in the long-term health of newborn calves. This calf needs to get up and nurse several times within the first four hours after birth, to ensure adequate consumption. (Alachua, Florida) When it comes to the health of newborn calves, it all starts with the cow. The cow’s plain of …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/03/06/the-cow-is-the-first-source-of-calf-health/

Webinar: Farmers Making a Smart Choice for Health Insurance

Date: January 28, 2015 Time: 1:00 – 2:30 Eastern Time (12:00-1:30 pm CT) Presented by national expert: Dr. Roberta Riportella, Kansas State University Extension A panel of experts have been invited to answer questions, including: IRS SBA Participants will learn how the Affordable Care Act affects farm/ranch families as individuals (consumers), as business operators, and …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2015/01/24/webinar-farmers-making-a-smart-choice-for-health-insurance/

Reduce Maintenance and Improve Palm Health!

Over-pruning. Photo credit: JB McConnell, UF/IFAS Many people picture sugar sand beaches, emerald green water, and gorgeous palm trees swaying in the breeze when they think about visiting or moving to Florida. The panhandle offers the beautiful Gulf of Mexico and sugar sand beaches, but sometimes its palms look a bit deficient. Why is that …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/12/02/reduce-maintenance-and-improve-palm-health/

Panhandle Equine Health and Management Workshop

Photo by Jennifer Bearden Join us for an educational evening! Topics will include: Equine Digestive System and Nutrition Equine Dental Care Internal Parasites of Equines Quality Forages   When:  December 9, 2014 Time:  6-8:30pm Where:  UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center, Quincy   Download the flyer to share this information with other horse enthusiasts: …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/11/15/panhandle-equine-health-and-management-workshop/

Personal Comment: A land-grant president for UF By Jack Payne The selection of Dr. W. Kent Fuchs (pronounced “Fox”) as the next president of the University of Florida should be cause for celebration for anyone who cares about Florida agriculture and natural resources. I’ll confess, I had some initial apprehension about whether an electrical engineer would be properly attuned to the importance of UF’s land-grant mission. But I had the chance to take the measure of the man one-on-one over a 21Ž2-hour dinner as part of UF’s efforts to recruit top leaders to apply for the presidency, and I’m convinced he will support university research, extension and teaching that improve the lives of all Floridians. I endorse Fuchs, who still has to be confirmed by the State University System Board of Governors. Fuchs was born into a hardscrabble existence on an Oklahoma farm. It was such a tough life that his dad decided Alaska would be more forgiving, and it’s where Fuchs grew up until the family moved to Miami, where he attended high school. And let’s remember, he’s provost at one of the most venerable of land-grant universities, Cornell. It’s the only Ivy League school with a horticultural department, much less a School of Integrative Plant Science like the one Fuchs helped launch. Before Cornell, he was a leader at Purdue, also a land-grant university, and taught and researched at a third, the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. With his Florida, agriculture, and land-grant bona fides, he sold me on being the right person for the job when he told me that if hired he would go on a statewide tour of stakeholder meetings. Not just to meet donors and alumni, but growers, commodity leaders, natural resource managers and UF/IFAS Extension agents. That’s a promising sign that he intends to honor the public-service ethic of the land-grant university. He sees his new job the same way I see mine — that his office is not a room in Gainesville, but it’s the entire state. He’s walking the walk in New York with the recently announced Engaged Cornell, a $150 million initiative that aims to institutionalize a mandatory public-service component in undergraduate education so students contribute to solving problems outside the university gates. UF’s land-grant mission is supposed to apply universitywide. Traditionally, though, UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences has more demonstrably implemented it than many other branches of the university. There’s potential for real change in this area as our medical center leaders see in Extension the opportunity to do so much more to promote public health. Similarly, our engineering administrators have approached IFAS about working through Extension to bring technical assistance to businesses and communities. There are also opportunities for IFAS to do more to serve Florida’s $142-billion-a-year agriculture and natural resource industries, particularly after six years of flat or declining state funding. Support from UF’s leader is essential to IFAS’s quest to provide solutions to citrus greening, efforts to tackle the state’s water qualityand water supply challenges, ambitious plans to expand the work of our agricultural leadership institute and work in helping Florida prepare for climate change and sea-level rise. The land-grant system was founded more than 150 years ago on the noble proposition of democratizing higher education. Today we have an opportunity to define the 21st century land-grant institution that is true to its mission while responding to the pressing problems of today. Today IFAS seeks support from the UF administration to expand four-year online degree programs. We offer these at a discounted tuition to students who by choice or circumstance need a UF education to come to them instead of having to move to Gainesville. Appalled by anecdotes of students going hungry or even scrounging from garbage bins, we at IFAS have begun formally assessing the extent of food security on campus as the first step toward establishing a food pantry for students in need. We’re hiring more bilingual 4-H agents and partnering with organizations that serve minority populations as we seek to better serve people who have traditionally been underrepresented in our youth development programs. It’ll take a commitent from the top to secure the resources needed to realize IFAS’s potential. That commitment starts with an appreciation of the land-grant mission. Fuchs has looked me in the eye and shown me he has it. Over salad, I began probing the extent to which this man intended to honor the land-grant mission with action. By decafs and dessert, I was presenting him with the Gator pin right off my own lapel and letting him know he’d be receiving a copy of A Land Remembered from me. The presidential search committee on which I served declared a strong academic background an essential criteria for our next leader. The distinguished research background Fuchs has and his Ivy League experience more than satisfy that. Some of us on the search committee – which also included IFAS plant breeder Harry Klee — also championed an appreciation for the land-grant mission as an important consideration in the search for a new president. We’re gratified to see we have it in Kent Fuchs, and we hope you’ll get to see it when he visits your region. Jack Payne is senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources, University of Florida, and head of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

By Jack Payne The selection of Dr. W. Kent Fuchs (pronounced “Fox”) as the next president of the University of Florida should be cause for celebration for anyone who cares about Florida agriculture and natural resources. I’ll confess, I had some initial apprehension about whether an electrical engineer would be properly attuned to the importance …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/31/personal-comment-a-land-grant-president-for-uf-by-jack-payne-the-selection-of-dr-w-kent-fuchs-pronounced-fox-as-the-next-president-of-the-university-of-florida-should-be-cause-f/

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