Monthly Archive: October 2014

Monitoring for a Potential Pathogen in Florida Potato and Tomato

Fig.1. Shoots of zebra chip affected potato plants infected with Ca. Liberibacter solanacearum. Leaves on younger shoots display purpling, and older leaves are chlorotic. The leaves are also rolled. (Photos courtesy: Dr. Lia Liefting). Dr. Binoy Babu, Dr. Nicholas Dufault, Dr. Mathews Paret, and Dr. Carrie Harmon During the 2000 growing season in Texas, a …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/31/monitoring-for-a-potential-pathogen-in-florida-potato-and-tomato/

2014-15 Alabama Beef Cattle Reproductive Management Series

The Alabama Cooperative Extension has announced their 2014-15 Beef Cattle Reproductive Management Series.  The course will focus on Estrus Synchronization and Fixed Time Artificial Insemination Workshops. Download the printable flyer here:  Beef Reproduction Management Series Flyer 2014 The courses will be offered at the following locations: November 24th 8:00 a.m. Wiregrass Research and Extension Center Headland, AL …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/31/2014-15-alabama-beef-cattle-reproductive-management-series/

Dr. Jack Payne’s Personal Comment: A land-grant president for UF

By Jack Payne The selection of Dr. W. Kent Fuchs (pronounced “Fox”) as the next president of the University of Florida should be cause for celebration for anyone who cares about Florida agriculture and natural resources. I’ll confess, I had some initial apprehension about whether an electrical engineer would be properly attuned to the importance …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/31/dr-jack-paynes-personal-comment-a-land-grant-president-for-uf/

Personal Comment: A land-grant president for UF By Jack Payne The selection of Dr. W. Kent Fuchs (pronounced “Fox”) as the next president of the University of Florida should be cause for celebration for anyone who cares about Florida agriculture and natural resources. I’ll confess, I had some initial apprehension about whether an electrical engineer would be properly attuned to the importance of UF’s land-grant mission. But I had the chance to take the measure of the man one-on-one over a 21Ž2-hour dinner as part of UF’s efforts to recruit top leaders to apply for the presidency, and I’m convinced he will support university research, extension and teaching that improve the lives of all Floridians. I endorse Fuchs, who still has to be confirmed by the State University System Board of Governors. Fuchs was born into a hardscrabble existence on an Oklahoma farm. It was such a tough life that his dad decided Alaska would be more forgiving, and it’s where Fuchs grew up until the family moved to Miami, where he attended high school. And let’s remember, he’s provost at one of the most venerable of land-grant universities, Cornell. It’s the only Ivy League school with a horticultural department, much less a School of Integrative Plant Science like the one Fuchs helped launch. Before Cornell, he was a leader at Purdue, also a land-grant university, and taught and researched at a third, the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. With his Florida, agriculture, and land-grant bona fides, he sold me on being the right person for the job when he told me that if hired he would go on a statewide tour of stakeholder meetings. Not just to meet donors and alumni, but growers, commodity leaders, natural resource managers and UF/IFAS Extension agents. That’s a promising sign that he intends to honor the public-service ethic of the land-grant university. He sees his new job the same way I see mine — that his office is not a room in Gainesville, but it’s the entire state. He’s walking the walk in New York with the recently announced Engaged Cornell, a $150 million initiative that aims to institutionalize a mandatory public-service component in undergraduate education so students contribute to solving problems outside the university gates. UF’s land-grant mission is supposed to apply universitywide. Traditionally, though, UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences has more demonstrably implemented it than many other branches of the university. There’s potential for real change in this area as our medical center leaders see in Extension the opportunity to do so much more to promote public health. Similarly, our engineering administrators have approached IFAS about working through Extension to bring technical assistance to businesses and communities. There are also opportunities for IFAS to do more to serve Florida’s $142-billion-a-year agriculture and natural resource industries, particularly after six years of flat or declining state funding. Support from UF’s leader is essential to IFAS’s quest to provide solutions to citrus greening, efforts to tackle the state’s water qualityand water supply challenges, ambitious plans to expand the work of our agricultural leadership institute and work in helping Florida prepare for climate change and sea-level rise. The land-grant system was founded more than 150 years ago on the noble proposition of democratizing higher education. Today we have an opportunity to define the 21st century land-grant institution that is true to its mission while responding to the pressing problems of today. Today IFAS seeks support from the UF administration to expand four-year online degree programs. We offer these at a discounted tuition to students who by choice or circumstance need a UF education to come to them instead of having to move to Gainesville. Appalled by anecdotes of students going hungry or even scrounging from garbage bins, we at IFAS have begun formally assessing the extent of food security on campus as the first step toward establishing a food pantry for students in need. We’re hiring more bilingual 4-H agents and partnering with organizations that serve minority populations as we seek to better serve people who have traditionally been underrepresented in our youth development programs. It’ll take a commitent from the top to secure the resources needed to realize IFAS’s potential. That commitment starts with an appreciation of the land-grant mission. Fuchs has looked me in the eye and shown me he has it. Over salad, I began probing the extent to which this man intended to honor the land-grant mission with action. By decafs and dessert, I was presenting him with the Gator pin right off my own lapel and letting him know he’d be receiving a copy of A Land Remembered from me. The presidential search committee on which I served declared a strong academic background an essential criteria for our next leader. The distinguished research background Fuchs has and his Ivy League experience more than satisfy that. Some of us on the search committee – which also included IFAS plant breeder Harry Klee — also championed an appreciation for the land-grant mission as an important consideration in the search for a new president. We’re gratified to see we have it in Kent Fuchs, and we hope you’ll get to see it when he visits your region. Jack Payne is senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources, University of Florida, and head of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

By Jack Payne The selection of Dr. W. Kent Fuchs (pronounced “Fox”) as the next president of the University of Florida should be cause for celebration for anyone who cares about Florida agriculture and natural resources. I’ll confess, I had some initial apprehension about whether an electrical engineer would be properly attuned to the importance …

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Preparing for a Livestock Show

For 4-H members and spectators alike, livestock shows are one of the most anticipated parts of a fair. Preparing your animal for a show begins months in advance. Great care is needed in feeding your animal, practicing showmanship, and making sure your animal is healthy. After all the time and effort that goes into raising …

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Paraná Pine, An Ancient-Looking Conifer for Modern Landscapes

Figure 1. Paraná pine has a narrow, pyramidal form when young.   Paraná Pine, Araucaria angustifolia: An ancient-looking conifer for modern landscapes Paraná pine is a primitive-looking conifer valued for its unusual horizontal branching, sharply pointed triangular needles and neat, symmetrical form. The primitive appearance of this evergreen tree results from its resemblance to and …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/28/parana-pine-an-ancient-looking-conifer-for-modern-landscapes/

Insects Take a Break in Winter

A common question about insects when cold temperatures arrive is whether or not the cold will kill many pests. Although temperatures will occasionally drop below freezing in north Florida, it is normally not cold enough to significantly impact insect populations for the upcoming year. Typical white grub of the genus Phyllophaga. Photograph by John L. …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/28/insects-take-a-break-in-winter/

Fruit Splitting in Dooryard Citrus

Split citrus fruit. Image credit UF / IFAS Citrus trees require a lot of care and attention to produce good quality fruit, yet even the most careful gardeners may run into the problem of split-fruit on their citrus trees.  Split-fruit is a condition which strikes citrus trees in September and October and can wipe out a …

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Bamboo: Attractive Ornamental or Invasive Nightmare?

Golden bamboo quickly establishes in an areas and pushes out all other plants. Bamboo, the tallest grass in north Florida, can be an attractive landscape specimen or an invasive nightmare. There are more than 700 species of bamboo worldwide, ranging in height from 12 inches to 100 feet or more in ideal growing conditions. In …

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Permanent link to this article: http://washington.ifas.ufl.edu/newsletters/2014/10/26/bamboo-attractive-ornamental-or-invasive-nightmare/

Florida’s Wildlife Conservations Policy for Predicted Coastal Habitat Loss Problems

“Within the past five years, nine of the 14 villages in Nunavik in northernmost Quebec have had to install cooling systems at community ice hockey arenas to keep the rinks cold during winter.“– The Arctic in the Anthropocene: Emerging Research Questions Have you wondered how Florida’s wildlife conservation policy planners and habitat managers are responding …

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